40 Essential Google Sheets Tips and Tricks [2022 Edition]

In this google sheets tips and tricks 2022 edition, find 40 tips and tricks to quickly master Google Sheets

12 Minutes
Table of Contents

Google Sheets Tips & Tricks 2022

Formatting Content

1. Quickly change number format

2. Display formulas as text strings

3. Convert a number to a string

4. Wrap text in certain cells

5. Use Google Sheets themes

6. Add borders to cells

7. Rotate the text in the spreadsheet

8. Set font size of the text

9. Change the number of decimal places of a value

10. Insert columns and rows between existing data

Spicing Up the Spreadsheet

11. Add checkboxes to the spreadsheet

12. Limit choices by adding a drop-down box

13. Lock the header row at the top

14. Apply conditional formatting to highlight cells that fulfilled a condition

15. Take advantage of the Slicer feature

16. Summarize data using Pivot Tables

Using Shortcuts to Work Faster

17. Show formulas instead of results

18. Ensure that spelling is correct

19. Paste the values instead of the formulas

20. Copy an array, then paste it with rows and columns flipped

21. Copy the formatting of one cell to another cell

22. Quickly check how a formula works

23. Use Filter View to filter out irrelevant data for analysis

24. Use Explorer feature

25. Access a list of keyboard shortcuts

Using Special Formulas

26. Check if the cell is really blank

27. Translate words using Google Translate

28. Verify if the text is in a valid email address format

29. Insert links to external sites

30. Properly capitalize names

31. List down unique entries in a selected array

32. Display formula using FORMULATEXT function

Expanding the Capabilities of the Spreadsheet

33. Add Custom Functions via the Script Editor

34. Use Google Sheets Add-ons

Collaborating through the Spreadsheet

35. Copy a specific sheet to a new spreadsheet

36. Revert to a previous version of the spreadsheet

37. See edit history

38. Add comments

39. Modify the link to spreadsheet to automatically copy it to the user’s Google Drive

40. Share the spreadsheet with other users

Even if you regularly use spreadsheets, you might not be familiar with the breadth and depth of their capabilities. This rings especially true with Google Sheets!


Google has been developing Google Sheets as part of its G Suite since 2006; and with today’s need for quick and easy ways of collaborating across the world, Google Sheets is an attractive solution to quickly analyze and process data. 


The original list of 32 tips and tricks has now been boosted with eight (8) new tips and tricks in this 2022 edition of this list! Are you ready?

Formatting Content

1. Quickly change number format

Typing a number that’s supposed to be a currency or a percentage? You can quickly change the number format of a cell by selecting it and then going to the main toolbar. Look for the following symbols:

The number of formatting symbols in the toolbar, highlighted.
The number of formatting symbols in the toolbar, highlighted.


Click the dollar symbol to change the number format to currency, automatically inserting a currency symbol and adding (or reducing) the decimal digits to two digits. 

Click on the percentage symbol to change the number format to percentage. Make sure the percentage is written in decimal form before doing this action.

2. Display formulas as text strings

Say you'd like to show a formula on your sheet to explain what you're doing in another cell... once you type it in, however, Google Sheets automatically runs it as an actual formula. What do you do now?


A simple trick to enter the formulas without Google Sheets processing them is by inserting an apostrophe ‘ before typing it. This tells Google Sheets to preserve the succeeding characters into a string.

A cell displaying a formula selected, with the content displayed on the formula bar. An apostrophe precedes the formula.
A cell displaying a formula selected, with the content displayed on the formula bar. An apostrophe precedes the formula. 


You can also do this using a recently-released function in Google Sheets. Scroll down to Tip 27 to read more. 

3. Convert a number to a string

Sometimes it is more convenient to process the number as a string. To do so, use the TEXT function to reference the cell containing the number or simply type a number inside the TEXT function. 

4. Wrap text in certain cells

If the cell contains a string that does not fit its size, you can make the text wrap inside the column by clicking Format on the main menu and then clicking Text wrapping in the drop-down menu. Another smaller drop-down menu will appear. Select Wrap. 

Text wrapping options: overflow, wrap, and clip. Overflow is set as the default option.
Text wrapping options: overflow, wrap, and clip. Overflow is set as the default option.

5. Use Google Sheets themes

Google Sheets has a set of themes you can apply to make any spreadsheet more visually appealing. 


To access the themes, click Format on the main menu. The Themes option is listed at the top of the drop-down list. A sidebar on the right side of the spreadsheet will appear, where you can choose the theme to apply. 


You can go further and create a customized theme! 

6. Add borders to cells

Besides adding fill colors and adding fonts and font styles, you can also add borders with almost the same functionality and flexibility as that of Microsoft Excel. You add borders by selecting the range of cells and then choosing the side or sides of the cells where you want to add a border. 

Border colors and styles can also be customized, so you can have dotted red borders or dashed blue borders.

Border options displayed after clicking the border symbol (a square box with four divisions). This includes options for which specific sides will be bordered and what border color and border style to apply.
Border options displayed after clicking the border symbol (a square box with four divisions).

7. Rotate the text in the spreadsheet

You can also rotate the text in the spreadsheet to give it a more aesthetic feel! Find the icon for Text Rotation on the toolbar, then select the preset angles visually shown as options. Additionally, you can input the specific angle to a textbox that will appear as well. 

Rotate text options.


8. Set font size of the text

You can make the text larger or smaller in Google Sheets. Simply look for a textbox with a number “10” along the main toolbar. You can either click on the arrow on the right side to choose from preset font sizes or type a value directly to the textbox.

Font size options


9. Change the number of decimal places of a value

You can increase or decrease the number of decimal places displayed for a certain value in Google Sheets. The icons are shown below. The icon of .0 with a left arrow underneath it is for decreasing the decimal places while the icon of .00 with a right arrow underneath is for increasing the decimal places.

Icons for decreasing and increasing the number of decimal places of a value.


Learn more about changing the number of decimal places of a value here.

10. Insert columns and rows between existing data

Google sheets allow you to insert additional columns and/or rows between cells that already have existing data. Click here to learn more about various methods available to you. 

Spicing Up the Spreadsheet

11. Add checkboxes to the spreadsheet

Sometimes you have to enter entries where the value is either TRUE or FALSE. You can make your job easier by changing the cells to checkboxes


To do so, highlight the cells or columns where checkboxes are to be added, then click Insert in the main menu, and then click Checkbox on the drop-down list.

12. Limit choices by adding a drop-down box

If the entries in a certain column or columns in your spreadsheet would have a limited number of choices, you can limit the possible choices and save more time by formatting them into drop-down boxes


Click Data on the main menu, then click Data validation. A pop-up box will appear, where you can set the list of items that should be chosen.

13. Lock the header row at the top

When reading a very long spreadsheet, it is often easy to forget what the individual columns are for. Fortunately, it is possible to lock the header row in Google Sheets


Simply drag down the thick gray bar in the upper-left corner of the spreadsheet until it is near the bottom of Row 1.

The thick gray line used to freeze/lock the top rows highlighted.
The thick gray line used to freeze/lock the top rows highlighted. 

14. Apply conditional formatting to highlight cells that fulfilled a condition

It is much easier to see which cells have fulfilled a certain condition if they are filled with a certain shade of color. To do so, we need to apply conditional formatting. Click Format on the main menu, then click Conditional formatting on the drop-down menu. 


A sidebar will appear on the right side of the spreadsheet where you can include the condition that needs to be checked. 

The Conditional formatting option from the Format menu highlighted.
The Conditional formatting option from the Format menu highlighted.


To learn more, check out this tutorial on conditional formatting: How to Use Conditional Formatting Based on Another Cell in Google Sheets 

15. Take advantage of the Slicer feature

The new Slicer feature by Google Sheets allows you to filter a long sheet to see entries that you are looking for. The Slicer automatically analyzes the sheet for common patterns in the entries and uses them as potential filters for slicing the data, with the relevant entries remaining.


To learn more, you can check our tutorial here: How to Use the Google Sheets Slicer: Filtering Data by Value or Condition 

A Slicer widget on a sheet. The Slicer is set to filter the rows by its value under the date column.
A Slicer widget on a sheet. The Slicer is set to filter the rows by its value under the date column.

16. Summarize data using Pivot Tables

A handy tool to summarize the data in a large spreadsheet is by using the Pivot Table feature of Google Sheets. Click on any cell containing the relevant data, then click Data on the main menu then click Pivot table in the drop-down menu. 


A pop-up box will appear, asking you whether to add the Pivot Table in the new sheet or insert it in the existing sheet. A pivot table will now be produced, where you can select which values to display and aggregate. 

A Pivot Table summarizing the total amount of items and profit per date.
A Pivot Table summarizing the total amount of items and profit per date. 


You can learn more in our in-depth guide: Jumpstarting Data Analysis with Pivot Tables


Using Shortcuts to Work Faster

17. Show formulas instead of results

If you want to check the consistency of the formulas entered in the spreadsheet without modifying the spreadsheet, click View in the main menu and then click Show formula in the drop-down menu. The formulas will be shown instead of the results.

The Show formulas option from the View menu highlighted.
The Show formulas option from the View menu highlighted. 

18. Ensure that spelling is correct

Google Sheets allows you to check the spelling of the words. Click Tools on the main menu, then look for Spelling. Click on it to find Spell check. Click Spell check and Google Sheets will automatically check the spelling of the words in the sheet.

Tools menu clicked, Spelling option selected, Spell check highlighted.
Tools menu clicked > Spelling option selected > Spell check highlighted 

19. Paste the values instead of the formulas

Often we need to copy the resulting values of an array of formulas to another sheet. To paste the values instead of the formulas, use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+V. 


Another way is to right-click on the cell where you want to paste the values, then click Paste special, then click Paste values only.

Paste special options listed. The “Paste values only” option is on the top of the list.
Paste special options listed. The “Paste values only” option is on the top of the list. 

20. Copy an array, then paste it with rows and columns flipped

If you have an array that you need to copy, but with rows and columns flipped, simply copy the array, then right-click on the first cell where you want to paste the array. Click Paste special, and then click Paste transposed on the list of options that will appear on the right side (or sometimes left side).

Paste special options listed. The “Paste transposed” option is on the bottom of the list.
Paste special options listed. The “Paste transposed” option is on the bottom of the list. 

21. Copy the formatting of one cell to another cell

It is also possible to copy the formatting of one cell to another cell without changing the data in the destination cell. Copy the cell containing the desired format, then click on the destination cell, then use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+V.

22. Quickly check how a formula works

There is a trick for situations where you know the formula to use but you suddenly forgot its syntax. When you type a formula in Google Sheets, a small blue box with a question mark will appear on the formula bar. Click on it to see a short description of the formula including how the input should be written.

A quick guide to the formula entered into the formula bar. The quick guide appears after clicking the small box with a question mark that appears when you complete the name of the formula without the input arguments.
A quick guide to the formula entered into the formula bar. The quick guide appears after clicking the small box with a question mark that appears when you complete the name of the formula without the input arguments.

23. Use Filter View to filter out irrelevant data for analysis

Google Sheets has a function called Filter View, where you can apply certain conditions to filter out rows that do not fulfill these conditions. The main advantage of Filter Views is that its changes will not modify the original sheet; they only appear to the user while browsing the spreadsheet and will be discarded once the spreadsheet is closed.

An example of Filter View in action.


Click here to learn more about Filter Views. 

24. Use Explorer feature

When starting to analyze a huge dataset in Google Sheets, you may need a little nudge to look in the right places for meaningful patterns. Google Sheets’ Explorer feature helps jumpstart your analysis. To use it, click anywhere in the data, then either click the Explore button on the lower-right corner of Google Sheets, or simply press Alt+Shift+X on your keyboard. A sidebar will appear on the right side of Google Sheets, with preliminary analysis of your data. Often this includes a Pivot Table and a few charts.

Explorer feature as a sidebar to Google Sheets. 


25. Access a list of keyboard shortcuts

You can access a list of keyboard shortcuts while using Google Sheets by pressing Ctrl + /. This will open a window containing the keyboard shortcuts grouped by category.

The Keyboard shortcuts window containing the keyboard shortcuts for Google Sheets.
The Keyboard shortcuts window containing the keyboard shortcuts for Google Sheets. 

Using Special Formulas

26. Check if the cell is really blank

Characters that do not show up in the spreadsheet, such as apostrophes and stray spaces can mess up the results of the COUNTA function which you may use to check the number of cells with existing entries. The solution is to use the ISBLANK function to spot which cells contain the offending characters.


27. Translate words using Google Translate

Google Sheets has a built-in GOOGLETRANSLATE function that you can use to translate simple words from an original language to a certain target language. Specify the cell containing the text, and the original and the target language. 

English words “nice”, “money”, and “profit”, translated to Korean, Japanese, and French, respectively, by using the GOOGLETRANSLATE() function.
English words “nice”, “money”, and “profit”, translated to Korean, Japanese, and French, respectively, by using the GOOGLETRANSLATE function. 

28. Verify if the text is in a valid email address format

If a certain column is designated for containing email addresses, you can use the ISEMAIL function to check if the syntax of the email is in a valid email address format. This will help you filter out the obvious responses that do not fit the syntax of a valid email address.

29. Insert links to external sites

To insert links to external sites, Google Sheets has a built-in HYPERLINK function. The syntax is as follows:


=HYPERLINK(“url”,”label”)


For our example below, we used the following syntax:


=hyperlink("www.lido.app","Lido App")


And we got the following result:

A hyperlink added in a cell using the HYPERLINK function. 


30. Properly capitalize names

Google Sheets has a built-in function called PROPER that you can use to properly capitalize names. It does not just capitalize the first letters of the names but also changes to lowercase the letters that are not the first letters of the names.

An improperly capitalized name is properly capitalized using the PROPER function.


31. List down unique entries in a selected array

You can use the UNIQUE function to list down all unique entries in a selected column. Type in the function, and then select the column you want to filter.

The unique entries in a selected column with repeating entries is listed in the next column using the UNIQUE() function.
The unique entries in a selected column with repeating entries is listed in the next column using the UNIQUE function. 


32. Display formula using FORMULATEXT function

Back in Tip 2, we demonstrated a simple workaround of inserting an apostrophe in a formula so it is converted into a string. What if you want to keep the formula working but want to display it as a string in a different cell? Simply use the FORMULATEXT function. The syntax is simple: simply point the FORMULATEXT to the cell containing the formula. For example, if the formula is in A1, simply add:


=FORMULATEXT(A1)


And the formula used in A1 is displayed as a string.

Expanding the Capabilities of the Spreadsheet

33. Add Custom Functions via the Script Editor

Are the current functions not enough for what you want to do? Google Sheets allows you to add custom functions through its Apps Script. 


The Apps Script allows you to add a JavaScript-based code that defines a custom function. You can access it by clicking Extension and then selecting Apps Script. The Apps Script will load in a new tab or window. 

The Apps Script, where you can add JavaScript-based functions to add functionality to your spreadsheet. 


Click here to check one tutorial that uses Google Apps Script. 

34. Use Google Sheets Add-ons

If you don’t want to learn JavaScript, you can always look for Google Sheet add-ons by clicking Extensions in the main menu, then Add-ons, then clicking Get add-ons. A box will load listing the available add-ons. You can also search for a specific add-on that you want to use. 

The Add-ons library, titled Google Workspace Marketplace. It contains a search bar at the top of the library to help you look for the add-on you want. 


Collaborating through the Spreadsheet

35. Copy a specific sheet to a new spreadsheet

If you want to copy a specific sheet to a new spreadsheet (for example, to preserve the data at the moment), just right-click on the tab of the sheet on the bottom of Google Sheets. A list of options will appear. Click Copy to, and select New spreadsheet. 

A selected tab right-clicked. A list of options appears; the Copy to option selected. The New spreadsheet highlighted. 


36. Revert to a previous version of the spreadsheet

Google Sheets allows you to revert to a previous version of the spreadsheet seamlessly. To do so, click on the link on the upper part of the Google Sheets that begins with “Last edit was…” 

A portion of the Google Sheets page, focused on the “Last edit was 2 days ago” link at the top-center portion of the page.
A portion of the Google Sheets page, focused on the “Last edit was 2 days ago” link at the top-center portion of the page. 


This will bring you to a page with a right sidebar listing the previous versions of the spreadsheet while displaying it on the left side of the page. 

The Version history page of Google Sheets. On the right sidebar is the list of versions of the spreadsheet. The highlighted version is displayed on the left side of the page.
The Version history page of Google Sheets. On the right sidebar is the list of versions of the spreadsheet. The highlighted version is displayed on the left side of the page.


37. See edit history

Google Sheets also includes a way to see the edit history for an individual cell. Right-click on the target cell, then select Edit History. A small box will appear listing down each edit done, with a set of arrows on the top for going back and forth through the edit history.

Edit history box of a specific cell shown.
Edit history box of a specific cell shown. 


38. Add comments

If you are reviewing a sheet and want to place comments on certain cells without changing the content (or you don’t have access rights to outright edit them), you can use the comments feature of Google Sheets. Select a cell where you want to place a comment, then press Ctrl+Alt+M


A small window will appear where you can write your comment. It will appear alongside the name on the email address you used in adding the comment. 

The comment box where you can enter comments to a specific cell.
The comment box where you can enter comments to a specific cell. 

39. Modify the link to spreadsheet to automatically copy it to the user’s Google Drive

If you need to make the spreadsheet accessible to other users but also make them copy it instead of modifying the original one, you can simply edit the ending of the link to your spreadsheet by changing the “edit” portion to “copy”:


From 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/code_of_spreadsheet/edit


To 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/code_of_spreadsheet/copy


Upon clicking the new link, you will arrive at the following screen:

Prompt showing upon clicking the modified link. 

40. Share the spreadsheet with other users

To share the spreadsheet for real-time collaboration, click the Share button on the upper-right corner of the Google Sheets. A pop-up box will load where you can enter the email addresses of the members of your team who need to access the spreadsheet for collaboration. 

The Share with people and groups box. A space is added where you can add users by typing either their email addresses or their names if you regularly correspond with them.
Textbox where you can add users by typing either their email addresses or their names if you regularly correspond with them. 


Once you enter the email address, you can choose whether the user can just view, comment, or outright edit the spreadsheet. You can also add a custom message alongside giving the user access as Google Sheets will send an email to that user to notify them that they have access rights to the spreadsheet you are using.

After entering an email address, You can add a custom message before sending them.
After entering an email address, you can add a custom message before sending them.


Additional Resources

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